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NFL’s best players are now insured, according to research

A study released on Thursday revealed that NFL players were not only healthier and happier in the aftermath of Hurricane Matthew, but also more financially stable than before the storm hit.

According to a report by the University of Michigan’s Health Policy Institute, players were now insured for an average of $1,300 less than before Matthew hit, while they were only $200 more off than they were before the devastating storm.

The study also found that players were $3,000 more likely to have received disability insurance coverage compared to before the hurricane hit.

In terms of health insurance, the researchers said that in 2017, a total of 1.7 million players in the NFL were covered through insurance companies.

“We also found a significant decline in the number of players who were underinsured in 2017,” the researchers wrote.

“While an average player was covered by an insurance company in 2017 for $1.7m, in 2017 they were covered by just $300 more.

This means that a player’s premium had fallen by $2,500 in 2017 and by $6,000 in 2020.”

While this is an increase from the previous year, it’s still a huge amount.

A $300 increase in premium payments could be considered a significant decrease in health insurance coverage for a large chunk of the population.

The researchers said they expected the number to rise further once the number for 2016 was released.

“In 2017, players who experienced severe and/or catastrophic injuries incurred more than $2.2 billion in health costs, including $1 billion in medical bills,” the report said.

“This was a significant increase from 2016, which showed that nearly 2 million players experienced a concussion in 2017.

While we expect this trend to continue, it is important to note that the number in 2017 did not necessarily reflect an actual increase in health care costs,” the study said.”

Players are also the ones most likely to be the first to report adverse health outcomes, such as heart attacks and strokes, after a concussion.

While we expect this trend to continue, it is important to note that the number in 2017 did not necessarily reflect an actual increase in health care costs,” the study said.